Starting a New 100 Day Kanji Challenge

. Wednesday, March 7, 2018 .


Happy Wednesday! I'm coming to you from my comfy room because today is a snow day! I was given the day off because of the copious amount of snow falling in Albany, NY.

I realize that, since my return to NY, I haven't been sharing much about my language journey in Japanese. A few things have changed since Japan, so I wanted to talk about that before I segway into my next language learning challenge!

Originally, I was planning on studying for the JLPT N2, which is the Japanese Language Proficiency Test issued by the Japanese government. There are certain study sets that are created online to prep for this test, so I was planning on using that to increase my vocabulary. However, I don't plan on actually taking this test in the near future, so I decided to switch my goal to focus on a more Kanji-based curriculum and learn vocab from the new Kanji I encounter. 

To evaluate my progress, I'm going to take the J-CAT every 6 months or so. The J-CAT is like the JLPT, but it can be taken at home, in about an hour. It's totally free, but the results aren't as helpful to list on your resume compared to the JLPT.

I would normally use the app Kanji Study, which I did a review on in this post, however, they don't have an app for iPad, which is my main companion while I study. For that reason, I'll be trying out a new app, iKanji. I'll be exploring the limitations of their free app, and deciding if it's worth it to pay for premium. I reached out to the creator of Kanji Study for comment on when the iPad version will be released:



So let's get into the details of the challenge!




100 Days. I think this is juuuust long enough! I was throwing the idea of 20 weeks around, but I feel like 100 days feels less overwhelming.



 I plan to study all unknown Jōyō Kanji up to Grade 5. There are some scattered in Grade 2 and 3 that I don't feel confident about, but the focus will mainly be on Grade 4.



My goal is 10 kanji per week, similar to my previous Kanji Challenge. 



My main study methods will be the following: Using a notebook to write down study notes, paper flashcards to practice memorization, and of course: the iKanji app. I prefer to write things out on paper because I feel it helps me commit things to memory better!

I wanted to show off some cute graphics of my first 10 Kanji. These are Grade 2 level (the last two are Grade 3) that I know but don't feel totally confident with. I hope you like these little photos, I tried to make them very studyblr-esque! 













These are my 10 Kanji for the first week! I'm excited to get started, I hope you enjoyed these photos!









Happy Wednesday! I'm coming to you from my comfy room because today is a snow day! I was given the day off because of the copious amount of snow falling in Albany, NY.

I realize that, since my return to NY, I haven't been sharing much about my language journey in Japanese. A few things have changed since Japan, so I wanted to talk about that before I segway into my next language learning challenge!

Originally, I was planning on studying for the JLPT N2, which is the Japanese Language Proficiency Test issued by the Japanese government. There are certain study sets that are created online to prep for this test, so I was planning on using that to increase my vocabulary. However, I don't plan on actually taking this test in the near future, so I decided to switch my goal to focus on a more Kanji-based curriculum and learn vocab from the new Kanji I encounter. 

To evaluate my progress, I'm going to take the J-CAT every 6 months or so. The J-CAT is like the JLPT, but it can be taken at home, in about an hour. It's totally free, but the results aren't as helpful to list on your resume compared to the JLPT.

I would normally use the app Kanji Study, which I did a review on in this post, however, they don't have an app for iPad, which is my main companion while I study. For that reason, I'll be trying out a new app, iKanji. I'll be exploring the limitations of their free app, and deciding if it's worth it to pay for premium. I reached out to the creator of Kanji Study for comment on when the iPad version will be released:



So let's get into the details of the challenge!




100 Days. I think this is juuuust long enough! I was throwing the idea of 20 weeks around, but I feel like 100 days feels less overwhelming.



 I plan to study all unknown Jōyō Kanji up to Grade 5. There are some scattered in Grade 2 and 3 that I don't feel confident about, but the focus will mainly be on Grade 4.



My goal is 10 kanji per week, similar to my previous Kanji Challenge. 



My main study methods will be the following: Using a notebook to write down study notes, paper flashcards to practice memorization, and of course: the iKanji app. I prefer to write things out on paper because I feel it helps me commit things to memory better!

I wanted to show off some cute graphics of my first 10 Kanji. These are Grade 2 level (the last two are Grade 3) that I know but don't feel totally confident with. I hope you like these little photos, I tried to make them very studyblr-esque! 













These are my 10 Kanji for the first week! I'm excited to get started, I hope you enjoyed these photos!







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