Kanji Challenge: 2019!

. Wednesday, July 3, 2019 .


If you been with me on my blog since the very beginning you may remember the kanji challenge that I did about two summers ago. 


If you're clicking away to go back and check I have some bad news for you: All of that Kanji challenge has been removed from my blog, For some reason I can't really remember, the summer after I completed the challenge I removed all of the posts that I used to track my progress and included scans of the kanji book itself.


As I'm currently preparing to take the JLPT N2 in December, I was wondering what methods I could use to best study kanji. When I did this kanji challenge I created two summers ago I learned about 200 kanji within that time frame and I can say to this day that I still know them! With that in mind, I was considering whether or not I should do this challenge again since my method was really effective for me and help me learn a good amount of kanji relatively quickly.


You may have noticed that I have not been updating my blog as frequently as I used to and that's mainly because I'm struggling with ways to come up with content that I feel is both interesting to me and to other people. I hope that restarting the series will help me not only start posting on this blog a bit more but also provide a new resource to someone who's looking for an alternative way of learning kanji. 


As I was writing this post I tried to find my original kanji journal to share some scans of what I was learning two summers ago. However, since I've been back from college, a lot of items that I have been looking for have kind of been misplaced (by me!). If I can find the journal I would LOVE to use it again and continue my progress with it, but I have a feeling it's not going to turn up.

Luckily, I do have a few scans I found in my google photos! 

This is the Kanji Sheet creator I used to use.


This is how my journal looked!

The Concept

This post is mostly going to be an explanation of the kanji Challenge and how you can do it. I'm going to be listing methods, resources, and things you may need to know if you want to attempt this with me. 



You will need:


  • A dedicated Kanji Notebook
  • A printer
  • A pen or pencil
  • Access to the kanji you'd like to learn (more on this soon)

This may sound strange but this kanji challenge is taking place in a physical notebook. I know a lot of people learn online these days but I found that having a physical manifestation of everything that you've studied really helps connect knowledge. 

When I first did this challenge I created a list of kanji and put them into a stroke order identifier website. I then created a document with images of all the kanji and printed it out, cutting and pasting it into the notebook with a couple of words written on the side that use that kanji. 


I'm not going to lie it was pretty labor-intensive and I did it every single week. 


The website that I used at the time to make my kanji sheets now non-existent. I checked the website and it's been transformed into a manga site? I think. Instead, I'm trying an alternative method! http://jensechu.github.io/kanji/ has a database of JLPT kanji that you can access that automatically inputs present information into the cell. You can also search up kanji you may want to add. 


You need a printer because we are going to be printing out the sheets that we create using this website. I'm debating whether or not use the cut and paste method for putting it into my journal, but I think that's something we can work on in the next post.


I'm going to be using the preset JLPT kanji that are provided on the site, but if you have some kind of alternative site or perhaps an Anki deck that you want to put into this sheet format feel free to do so! I'm going to take a look at the Kanji they have listed staring with N3 kanji. If I do not feel 100 percent confident with them, I will add them to my study list.

If this challenge works out well, by December I should be halfway done with N2 Kanji!

I don't expect to reach full completion simply because there are so many words, so I'm trying to set a reachable goal :)

Essentially this method works for me because it explores different avenues of memorizing the kanji. First, you have to look up the kanji and print it out on the sheet. Then you do the practice sheet and fill it in. Next, you work on transferring that information into your journal. This creates a "study scrapbook", you could say! 

Lastly, you use your SRS or material to review the kanji on a daily basis for 1 week. I will be using the app Kanji Study (click here to read my review on it!). If you use any kind of SRS system or flash card type of thing don't worry about getting this app! All that matters is that you are engaging with the kanji that you set out to learn that week!


The amount of kanji that you choose to do every week is completely up to you. I think I did something between 10 and 15 kanji a week? This is just for me personally but at the end of every week, I would go to my printer and scan the sheets that I did, as well as my journal pages, to upload on my blog and show everyone what I did. When I did that it gave me a chance to look over my notes as well :)

I realize that when I write it out like this it may seem pretty intense. Some will say there are better methods for learning kanji but this one really stuck with me. Two years after the fact I STILL know all of the kanji quite well and that's what really matters!

Whether you are doing this challenge with me or just reading along, as always: thank you for reading :)


If you been with me on my blog since the very beginning you may remember the kanji challenge that I did about two summers ago. 


If you're clicking away to go back and check I have some bad news for you: All of that Kanji challenge has been removed from my blog, For some reason I can't really remember, the summer after I completed the challenge I removed all of the posts that I used to track my progress and included scans of the kanji book itself.


As I'm currently preparing to take the JLPT N2 in December, I was wondering what methods I could use to best study kanji. When I did this kanji challenge I created two summers ago I learned about 200 kanji within that time frame and I can say to this day that I still know them! With that in mind, I was considering whether or not I should do this challenge again since my method was really effective for me and help me learn a good amount of kanji relatively quickly.


You may have noticed that I have not been updating my blog as frequently as I used to and that's mainly because I'm struggling with ways to come up with content that I feel is both interesting to me and to other people. I hope that restarting the series will help me not only start posting on this blog a bit more but also provide a new resource to someone who's looking for an alternative way of learning kanji. 


As I was writing this post I tried to find my original kanji journal to share some scans of what I was learning two summers ago. However, since I've been back from college, a lot of items that I have been looking for have kind of been misplaced (by me!). If I can find the journal I would LOVE to use it again and continue my progress with it, but I have a feeling it's not going to turn up.

Luckily, I do have a few scans I found in my google photos! 

This is the Kanji Sheet creator I used to use.


This is how my journal looked!

The Concept

This post is mostly going to be an explanation of the kanji Challenge and how you can do it. I'm going to be listing methods, resources, and things you may need to know if you want to attempt this with me. 



You will need:


  • A dedicated Kanji Notebook
  • A printer
  • A pen or pencil
  • Access to the kanji you'd like to learn (more on this soon)

This may sound strange but this kanji challenge is taking place in a physical notebook. I know a lot of people learn online these days but I found that having a physical manifestation of everything that you've studied really helps connect knowledge. 

When I first did this challenge I created a list of kanji and put them into a stroke order identifier website. I then created a document with images of all the kanji and printed it out, cutting and pasting it into the notebook with a couple of words written on the side that use that kanji. 


I'm not going to lie it was pretty labor-intensive and I did it every single week. 


The website that I used at the time to make my kanji sheets now non-existent. I checked the website and it's been transformed into a manga site? I think. Instead, I'm trying an alternative method! http://jensechu.github.io/kanji/ has a database of JLPT kanji that you can access that automatically inputs present information into the cell. You can also search up kanji you may want to add. 


You need a printer because we are going to be printing out the sheets that we create using this website. I'm debating whether or not use the cut and paste method for putting it into my journal, but I think that's something we can work on in the next post.


I'm going to be using the preset JLPT kanji that are provided on the site, but if you have some kind of alternative site or perhaps an Anki deck that you want to put into this sheet format feel free to do so! I'm going to take a look at the Kanji they have listed staring with N3 kanji. If I do not feel 100 percent confident with them, I will add them to my study list.

If this challenge works out well, by December I should be halfway done with N2 Kanji!

I don't expect to reach full completion simply because there are so many words, so I'm trying to set a reachable goal :)

Essentially this method works for me because it explores different avenues of memorizing the kanji. First, you have to look up the kanji and print it out on the sheet. Then you do the practice sheet and fill it in. Next, you work on transferring that information into your journal. This creates a "study scrapbook", you could say! 

Lastly, you use your SRS or material to review the kanji on a daily basis for 1 week. I will be using the app Kanji Study (click here to read my review on it!). If you use any kind of SRS system or flash card type of thing don't worry about getting this app! All that matters is that you are engaging with the kanji that you set out to learn that week!


The amount of kanji that you choose to do every week is completely up to you. I think I did something between 10 and 15 kanji a week? This is just for me personally but at the end of every week, I would go to my printer and scan the sheets that I did, as well as my journal pages, to upload on my blog and show everyone what I did. When I did that it gave me a chance to look over my notes as well :)

I realize that when I write it out like this it may seem pretty intense. Some will say there are better methods for learning kanji but this one really stuck with me. Two years after the fact I STILL know all of the kanji quite well and that's what really matters!

Whether you are doing this challenge with me or just reading along, as always: thank you for reading :)

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